All posts tagged History

How Canada’s Scientists Mapped the Arctic North and Weathered the Cold War

In the 1940s and 1950s, atmospheric studies of Canada’s Arctic North were defined by technological failure. Edward Jones-Imhotep tells the story of the Cold War from a new vantage point—that of an “unreliable nation.”

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The Immigrants Who Supplied the Smithsonian’s Fish Collection

The Smithsonian’s fish collection preserves not just specimens but the labor and knowledge of immigrant fishermen on the California coast.

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Scope of Daylight Saving Movement

When We Repealed Daylight Saving Time

In 1922, 16 states and 137 cities followed Daylight Saving Time—and the rest of the country did not. Repealing Daylight Saving Time only made the map of national temporal borders more complex, causing heartbreak and confusion at the border.

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Photo of Jason W. Moore

The Case for Ecological Reparations: A Conversation with Jason W. Moore

Making things right in the face of climate change demands that colonialism, race, and gender take center stage in the story of capitalism.

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The Black Birders Who Made White Ornithologists Famous

Nancy Jacobs’ new book uncovers how African birders and vernacular birding knowledge helped build European imperial science.

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A picture of Gregory Cushman

The Fragile Society We’ve Built from Rocks: A Conversation With Gregory Cushman

Fertilizers, computers, gasoline, and other parts of our everyday lives come from irreplaceable deposits found in the Earth. But how long will they last?

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The Wisconsin Idea in action. Byron Crouse (right), associate dean in the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, meets with Jim Fahey (left), the owner of Praireland Dairy near Belleville, Wisconsin. Crouse has helped to create Co-op Care, a program designed to increase the number of farmers and other rural business owners that have access to affordable health insurance programs with benefits that include preventative services. Photo by Bryce Richter, December 2008. Courtesy of UW–Madison University Communications. 

Rural People and Academic Elites Saved Higher Education Once. They Can Do It Again.

Rural resentment is nothing new. When one university reckoned with it a century ago, it convinced farmers that the university worked for them—and improved itself in the process.

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Chicken nuggets against a blue square background imposed in the upper-left corner of an image of a charred industrial kichen after a fire, run through with horizontal red stripes, suggests an image of the U.S. flag.

How’d We Get So Cheap? A Conversation with Bryant Simon

The author of “The Hamlet Fire” discusses a deadly blaze at a chicken-processing facility and the logics of cheapness which provided the kindling.

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Crowd at opening ceremony at the Woodstock music festival, 1969

An Environmental Playlist of the Twentieth Century

Take a trip through the twentieth century to explore the development of environmental themes through popular music.

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A portrait of a young Napoleon Bonaparte in military dress starting at the viewer with a white mountain and blue clouds behind him.

Painting an Empire: Landscapes of Napoleon’s Dreams in Haiti

French landscape painting during the Haitian Revolution lays bare colonial concern for controlling both people and the environment.

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