All posts tagged History

Talking Transformation in Beijing

A conference in China brings graduate students from around the world together to discuss environmental transformation.

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Same Place, Different Photograph

Repeat photography is used by a range of scientists and artists as a form of data collection, but also raises deeper questions about the nature of truth.

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Sounding Calls

The forgotten soundscapes of the Old Mississippi River.

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Four Greco-Roman Perspectives on Humans and the Environment

What did ancient people think about human impacts on the environment? Four passages offer perspectives from Greece and Rome.

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On the move in Sinoe County, Liberia. Loring Whitman, October 18, 1926. Indiana University Liberian Collections

A Liberian Journey

Long-forgotten film footage launches a collaborative recollection of history and memory, and gives new meaning to the past in post-conflict Liberia.

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Rethinking Girodet’s Portrait of Citizen Belley

A late eighteenth-century painting of a moment that never happened illuminates our complex struggles with how to “deal with” the past.

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Nuclear power station row in Chernobyl. Photo by Tim Mousseau.

Chernobyl at Thirty: A Special Edition Environment and Health Roundtable

Drawing from presentations at the recent meeting of the American Society for Environmental History in Seattle, a historian, an ecologist, and a political scientist bring their different perspectives to bear on central questions of knowledge stirred by Chernobyl. What have we learned, or not?

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Global Visions: Rethinking the Globe and How We Teach It

A new website serves as a resource for educators in the global humanities.

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On Care in Dark Times

How Emily Dickinson might tell the story of the Anthropocene.

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Damming God? Making Sense of the Plan to Fix Niagara Falls

Recent news of restoration work at Niagara Falls provides an opportunity to reflect on how symbolic American landscapes become meaningful despite constant change.

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