Tagged: Climate

A flock of sheep walking on a dry and barren landscape along with two male pastoralists holding sticks.

What Time is the Nomad?

Natasha Maru engages with the pastoralist temporalities as experienced by Rabari nomads in Kachchh, India. This narrative ethnographic account highlights the changing rhythms of pastoral lifestyles with shifts in the political economy of the region.

fossilized whale hone erected on a cliff

The Matter with Time

Monika Szuba confronts deep time through the examination of decay, between what is real and what is synthetic. In this, she writes that the long durée is not long enough to conceive the anthropogenic change unfolding around us.

gemma clucas on Georgia island collects poop with an albatross; Seabird Research on Climate Change Impacts and Conservation

Penguins, Puffins, and the Science of Seabird Scat

Erin Hassett speaks with Dr. Gemma Clucas, a researcher at Cornell University who analyzes the poop of penguins and other seabirds to reveal deteriorating ocean health and changing fish population ecology. Dr. Clucas and fellow researchers travel to remote locations to collect the poop from common terns, penguins, puffins, and other seabirds.

A microphone, a laptop, a notebook, a cup, a photo frame, and some plants sit on a desk.

Eight Environmental Podcasts to Follow in 2024

Running out of podcasts? Fret not. Edge Effects editors have a list of environmental podcasts that they think you should listen to. This list encompasses a wide range of topics related to environmental and social change, including climate activism, corporate greenwashing, mining conflicts, and more.

Two persons wearing neon orange vest kneeling in front of a defaced painting hanging on the wall

The Art of Climate Protest

Jayme Collins explains how a new generation of climate activists draw from histories of protest art to reveal the ties between the art world and fossil fuel capitalism.

A bird's eye image of a single gray whale swimming in the open ocean.

The Ocean’s Beating Hearts

Hilary Clark reflects on how whale watching in Monterey helps reveal important marine multispecies connections—some more unexpected than others.