How Canada’s Scientists Mapped the Arctic North and Weathered the Cold War

In the 1940s and 1950s, atmospheric studies of Canada’s Arctic North were defined by technological failure. Edward Jones-Imhotep tells the story of the Cold War from a new vantage point—that of an “unreliable nation.”

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Winona LaDuke stands in a field behind three tall stalks of hemp that reach two feet above her head against a cloudy sky,

We Are the Seventh Generation: A Conversation with Winona LaDuke

Two centuries ago, Ojibwe people planned for seven generations to come. Today that seventh generation is fighting for the treaty rights their ancestors established and a just, sustainable future.

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The "Visions of Pullman" mural in Chicago's Pullman Neighborhood

How the Other Half Loved Nature

A recent book shows Chicago’s turn-of-the-century black and immigrant laborers embraced the great outdoors. Did they have any other choice?

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The Immigrants Who Supplied the Smithsonian’s Fish Collection

The Smithsonian’s fish collection preserves not just specimens but the labor and knowledge of immigrant fishermen on the California coast.

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Scope of Daylight Saving Movement

When We Repealed Daylight Saving Time

In 1922, 16 states and 137 cities followed Daylight Saving Time—and the rest of the country did not. Repealing Daylight Saving Time only made the map of national temporal borders more complex, causing heartbreak and confusion at the border.

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Photo of Jason W. Moore

The Case for Ecological Reparations: A Conversation with Jason W. Moore

Making things right in the face of climate change demands that colonialism, race, and gender take center stage in the story of capitalism.

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Jill Pelto illustration with the ocean in the foreground and two layers of glacier in the left rear, with the horizon shaped by a line graph moving down from left to right. Four suns are arranged in an arc in the background.

Apocalypse in Watercolor

To reach a broader audience, one artist and physical scientist takes data on environmental catastrophe and renders it beautiful.

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The Black Birders Who Made White Ornithologists Famous

Nancy Jacobs’ new book uncovers how African birders and vernacular birding knowledge helped build European imperial science.

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An aerial photograph shows beachfront damage caused by Hurricane Irma in South Florida.

After the Wind and the Rain: Making Sense of a Record Hurricane Season

Harvey, Irma, Maria. Why has there been so much damage, and what does it mean? A guide for reading helps make sense of disaster.

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A picture of Gregory Cushman

The Fragile Society We’ve Built from Rocks: A Conversation With Gregory Cushman

Fertilizers, computers, gasoline, and other parts of our everyday lives come from irreplaceable deposits found in the Earth. But how long will they last?

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