A group of people stand in front of houses that pitch and lean into one another on the "Drunken Row" of Victorian homes at Howard Street (now Van Ness) between 17th and 18th.

The Potential for Peril Built into San Francisco

An environmental history of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake weaves together urban planning, plate tectonics, Progressive-Era reform, and soil dynamics.

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The Kickapoo River and geological features, as seen from a boat.

Citizen Management in a Contested Landscape

An ecologically diverse nature reserve in Wisconsin’s famed Driftless Area thrives today because of state, tribal, and local collaboration.

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Erratic Monuments to a Melting World

As glaciers melt, they leave behind abandoned rocks and other erratics. This photo essay of the Alaskan wilderness explores how glacial erratics are time travelers, treasure troves, reliquaries, and rubble.

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Making the Nation in the Gilded Age: A Conversation with Richard White

To be outside the “home” was a dangerous place to be in Gilded Age America. Richard White tells the story of how the modern nation reluctantly came into being alongside the environmental crisis of the late nineteenth century.

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A psychogeographic represenation of friendship as depicted in artwork. It maps the paths between the homes of two friends, superimposed over an imagined landscape of the mind.

What A Card Game Teaches Us About Moving Through A City

The geography of a city can compel people to behave in predictable patterns. A new card game challenges players to rethink and explore urban spaces.

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How Canada’s Scientists Mapped the Arctic North and Weathered the Cold War

In the 1940s and 1950s, atmospheric studies of Canada’s Arctic North were defined by technological failure. Edward Jones-Imhotep tells the story of the Cold War from a new vantage point—that of an “unreliable nation.”

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Winona LaDuke stands in a field behind three tall stalks of hemp that reach two feet above her head against a cloudy sky,

We Are the Seventh Generation: A Conversation with Winona LaDuke

Two centuries ago, Ojibwe people planned for seven generations to come. Today that seventh generation is fighting for the treaty rights their ancestors established and a just, sustainable future.

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The "Visions of Pullman" mural in Chicago's Pullman Neighborhood

How the Other Half Loved Nature

A recent book shows Chicago’s turn-of-the-century black and immigrant laborers embraced the great outdoors. Did they have any other choice?

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The Immigrants Who Supplied the Smithsonian’s Fish Collection

The Smithsonian’s fish collection preserves not just specimens but the labor and knowledge of immigrant fishermen on the California coast.

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Scope of Daylight Saving Movement

When We Repealed Daylight Saving Time

In 1922, 16 states and 137 cities followed Daylight Saving Time—and the rest of the country did not. Repealing Daylight Saving Time only made the map of national temporal borders more complex, causing heartbreak and confusion at the border.

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