Tagged: Anthropocene

An Instagram post of a glacier, with a caption: Yesterday the #NWProject was in Pond Inlet in Nunavut, learning about the Ikaarvik program, which trains Inuit youth to participate in scientific work and encourages visiting Arctic researchers to engage with the community. Also bearded seals! Narwhals! And $58 12-packs of soda! Please note that my FB live didn’t happen (satellite issues)—communication remains very very difficult in the Arctic (this is my thesis). Photos much compressed to make it possible to post. #nsffunded #changingArctic #Arctic #Nunavut #Climatechange

The Social Media of Polar Exploration

Hester Blum’s new book, The News at the Ends of the Earth, explains why 19th-century newspapers printed on polar expeditions offer a model for communicating in the age of climate crisis.

A satellite image of the Mississippi River

Recording the Mississippi Soundscape: A Conversation with Monica Haller

Artist Monica Haller explores the Mississippi River as an Anthropocene site with intimate ties to her own family history. She records the underwater sounds of this historical waterway to trace connections between the river and legacies of slavery, philosophies of ownership, and environmental racism.

An aerial view of Haida Gwaii, an archipelago off the northern Pacific coast of Canada.

Who Gets to Have Ecoanxiety?

Anthropocene anxiety about uncertain climate futures is on the rise. For the Indigenous Haida Nation, ecoanxiety arrived 150 years ago.

Photo collage of rice, fields, and cotton plants

Plantation Legacies

The Anthropocene gives a name to human-caused environmental change. The Plantationocene puts colonialism, capitalism, and enduring racial hierarchies at the center of the conversation and asks what past and future modes of resistance might emerge.